This is the Truth About Obesity (It's Not What You Think)


The Truth About Obesity

In America, roughly 33% of adults and 25% of children are obese. Society assumes that individuals who struggle with obesity are lazy. The majority believe that overweight people simply eat too much. Sadly, this false paradigm exacerbates the problem. In reality, the issue of obesity is not that simple. 

To understand the weight epidemic in the United States, educate yourself about what’s really going on inside the body of people who struggle with weight gain. Obesity is a complex problem that you can begin to understand here. Empower yourself with the truth.

First, is Obesity a Disease? 

If this condition isn’t caused by laziness and simple overeating, what is it? Obesity is a multifaceted disease, often linked to numerous other adverse health conditions.

  • Osteoarthritis
  • Sleep apnea
  • Gynecological and sexual problems
  • Digestive problems
  • Cancer
  • Type 2 diabetes
  • Heart disease
  • Stroke

Furthermore, obesity is one of the few maladies that can have a negative impact on social health and interpersonal relationships. 

Obesity symptoms include being overweight, binge eating, potbelly, fatigue, and snoring. However, the disease is diagnosed by calculating a patient’s body mass index (BMI). It is determined when a person has a higher BMI than what is considered healthy.

What Are the 3 Classes of Obesity?

A person with a BMI of above 30 is considered obese. And, there are three classes of obesity.  

  • Class 1 Obesity: BMI of 30 to 34.9
  • Class 2 Obesity: BMI of 35 to 39.9
  • Class 3 Obesity: BMI of 40 or higher 

The ideal BMI for a healthy adult falls in a range between 18.5 and less than 29.9. Anything above this may be linked to other serious physical illnesses. 

How to Find Out if You Are Obese

Obesity can be quickly self-diagnosed. Enter your height and weight in this BMI calculator to discover your BMI and find out where you fall into the spectrum. 

Or, find your BMI using the following chart.

Height 

Underweight

Normal 

Overweight

Class 1 Obesity

Class 2 Obesity

Class 3 Obesity

4 ft 11 in 

< 91 lbs

91 - 118 lbs

119 - 142 lbs

143 - 166 lbs

167 - 190 lbs

> 191 lbs

5 ft

< 94 lbs

94 - 123 lbs

124 - 147 lbs

148 - 172 lbs

173 - 197 lbs

> 198 lbs

5 ft 1 in

< 97 lbs

97 - 127 lbs

128 - 152 lbs

153 - 178 lbs

179 - 203 lbs

> 204 lbs

5 ft 2 in

< 104 lbs

104 - 135 lbs

136 - 157 lbs

158 - 184 lbs

185 - 210 lbs

> 211 lbs

5 ft 3 in

< 107 lbs

107 - 140 lbs

141 - 163 lbs

164 - 190 lbs

191 - 217 lbs

> 218 lbs

5 ft 4 in

< 110 lbs

110 - 144 lbs

145 - 168 lbs

169 - 196 lbs

197 - 224 lbs

> 225 lbs

5 ft 5 in

< 114 lbs

114 - 149 lbs

150 - 179 lbs

180 - 203 lbs

204 - 231 lbs

> 232 lbs

5 ft 6 in

< 118 lbs

118 - 154 lbs

155 - 185 lbs

186 - 209 lbs

210 - 239 lbs

> 240 lbs

5 ft 7 in

< 121 lbs

121 -  158 lbs

159 - 190 lbs

191 - 215 lbs

216 - 246 lbs

> 247 lbs

5 ft 8 in

< 125 lbs

125 - 163 lbs

164 - 196 lbs

197 - 222 lbs

223 - 254 lbs

> 255 lbs

5 ft 9 in

< 128 lbs

128 - 168 lbs

169 - 202 lbs

203 - 229 lbs

230 - 261 lbs

> 262 lbs

5 ft 10 in

< 132 lbs

132 - 173 lbs

174 - 208 lbs

209 - 235 lbs

236 - 269 lbs

> 270 lbs

5 ft 11 in

< 136 lbs

136 - 178 lbs

179 - 214 lbs

215 - 242 lbs

243 - 277 lbs

> 278 lbs

6 ft

< 140 lbs

140 - 183 lbs

184 - 220 lbs

221 - 249 lbs

250 - 285 lbs

> 286 lbs

6 ft 1 in

< 144 lbs

144 - 188 lbs

189 - 226 lbs

227 - 257 lbs

258 - 293 lbs

> 294 lbs

6 ft 2 in

< 148 lbs

148 - 193 lbs

194 - 232 lbs

233 - 264 lbs

265 - 301 lbs

> 302 lbs

6 ft 3 in

< 152 lbs

152 - 199 lbs

200 - 239 lbs

240 - 271 lbs

272 - 310 lbs

> 311 lbs

6 ft 4 in

< 156 lbs

156 - 204 lbs

205 - 245 lbs

246 - 278 lbs

279 - 318 lbs

> 319 lbs

6 ft 5 in

< 160 lbs

160 - 209 lbs

210 - 251 lbs

252 - 286 lbs

287 - 327 lbs

> 328 lbs

6 ft 6 in

< 164 lbs

164 - 214 lbs

215 - 257 lbs

258 - 293 lbs

294 - 335 lbs

> 336 lbs

6 ft 7 in

< 168 lbs

168 - 219 lbs

220 - 263 lbs

264 - 300 lbs

301 - 344 lbs

> 345 lbs

 

Next, What Causes Obesity? 

If you struggle with obesity, you have no doubt counted calories, tried fad diets, exercised, and pushed yourself to near starvation in attempts to shed excess pounds. And, while diet and physical activity play a role in your health and weight, there is a reasonable explanation of why your efforts aren’t long term solutions. 

Obesity is affected partially by genetics with the gut microbiome as a contributing factor. Lifestyle choices, socioeconomic issues, age, pregnancy, lack of sleep, stress, and previous attempts to lose weight also play a role.

“You have 30 trillion cells and over 100 trillion gut bacteria that determine your overall health and ability to lose weight."

How Does Obesity Contribute to Diabetes? 

While type 2 diabetes is a multifactorial disease, many of the 250 contributing genetic regions associated with predisposition to the condition are shared with those of obesity. Obesity is not the sole cause of the disease that causes insulin resistance in the body, but it is a key risk factor. 

To understand type 2 diabetes and obesity, researchers have produced detailed genetic documentation based on molecular structures within DNA and disease-related intermediate phenotypes. 

These studies observe several genomic areas related to the following:

  • The interplay between β-cell failure
  • Insulin sensitivity
  • Appetite regulation 
  • Adipose storage

Researchers see repeatedly that obesity and type 2 diabetes are closely linked. 

So, Can Obesity be Cured? 

While healthy eating choices and exercise are recommended for obesity, there is no one-size-fits-all cure. The reason a cure can not be defined is that each individual body is different. Consequently, treatment should be recommended on a case-by-case basis because diet and exercise alone cannot cure obesity. 

While kale and spinach may be superfoods for some, these nutrient-packed greens can cause kidney stones in others. And, gluten-free products can be unhealthy for one group and simultaneously save the lives of those with celiac disease. So, for lasting results, obesity treatment needs to be personalized. 

With a genetic evaluation and gut bacteria analysis, physicians, health coaches, and individuals can create informed and effective healthcare and weight-management plans. 

Final Thoughts

Obesity is a life-threatening disease with direct links to other physical and social issues. The cause is complex with multiple, unique factors in every case. So, effective obesity treatment requires a customized strategy. 

Digbi Health has operationalized the first Gut Microbiome and DNA-based weight loss program covered by insurance companies. For personalized guidance to help you navigate your unique biology, metabolism, lifestyle, and food preferences, try a 6-month, customized gut biome and DNA-based weight loss program

 

Learn more about Digbi: 

Author: Ranjan Sinha


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